Creating a Car Paint Material with 3ds Max and VRay

What is all this about ?

Well in short this post came to be as a direct request from one of the subscribers. Namely i was asked how to create a realistic car paint material. Initially i thought it would be a short and boring topic to cover it for a video. Needless to say i was wrong, so very wrong.

 Starting at the base

As soon as i started taking a better look into the car paint shader it started to get interesting. To get a realistic car paint shader you would need to approach this as it was in real life. If you have ever bothered to read about car paint, you will learn that it’s a multple layer color.

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In the image above you have a case where the paint of the car is getting damaged. This actually allows us to see that even though this is a metallic shader, the base is actually very glossy. This means that the first layer will control the color and doesn’t need reflection. As soon as we get that done we can go over and create an additional layer for the coating. Once we have both of the layers created we can call it done or we can push on.

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The next step was to create the flakes you see in the metallic color when it’s sunny outside. To get this result i used Vray stochastic flakes material. This is a new addition to Vray since 3,6 . That means that if you want to get the same result as me you would need to have that version.  So if you want to see how i did the basic shader for the car paint material check out the video below.

 

Creating the Pearlescent color shader

After creating the basic shader i thought about pushing it a bit more and create a pearlescent version. That is basically a paint that changes color depending on the angle of viewing. You can see how that looks check out the image here.

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As you can see it looks cool and it’s really not that hard to achieve. What i did was mix a different diffuse color base with a different mix curve and got the result. But since rarely are things in Max that simple you can see me doing it in the video below.

So if you followed the two videos you now know how to create a basic and a pearlescent shader. And with that we put a end to today’s topic. As always if you enjoyed it make sure you like the videos, comment and share. And don’t forget to come back for more next time.

Basics of Quixel Megascans

After some issues with the host and the site being down for some time we are back, and we are continuing with another video about the new kid on the block, namely Quixel’s very own Megascans. Now if you haven’t heard about it don’t worry as it is a very new program (at the time that i am writing this) that has some amazing abilities when it comes down to creating environments and textures for them. So now that we gave it an amazing intro lets jump in and talk about the details.

Megascans is very good for both architectural (Specularity) and gaming (Roughness) workflows. What that means is that it can take the surfaces that you make and then export textures depending on what you need them for. In the video below you will see me start from scratch on a surface, basically what you would have when you install the program. From there i will show you where to get more surfaces, how to install them and then how to use them. We will see about the properties that each of the surface layers has, then add in an extra surface and blend them together and after that even add a coat layer and liquid layer. You will see that by controlling just these 3 types of layers you can get some amazing looking results, and that is without me touching on the 3D assets and adding any 3d scanned models into the scene. But instead of reading about it you can go check out the video and see it for yourself.

Now that you saw the video i hope that you guys are excited about it as i am, and if Megascans catches on some traction i am confident that it can change the playing field when it comes down to creating environments. In any case if you guys like the video click the like button and i’ll see to it that i make more about it and cover the 3D assets as well. For now that would be all so like always like, comment and share it around so it can reach more people.

Stay cool everybody and have fun learning.

Sculpting a Detailed Rock Asset in ZBrush

One of the most common models that you will have to model if you are doing architectural visualizations, and especially if you are doing assets for environments for the gaming industry is creating a model of a detailed rock or cliff formation. Well once you get to that point you will quickly come to a realization that even though at first glance it looks and sounds really simple, in reality rocks can provide a bit of a challenge and especially if you have never done it before. Well in today’s post i decided to tackle this issue and show you how you can create a fairly detailed rock in ZBrush, then make a low poly model of that and bake out normal maps and AO maps that you can use as a mask. To make it easier to follow i divided this into two videos so it’s easier to understand.

In the first video we will start with a little intro and a general overview of what kinds of a rocks we can see after which we will jump straight in ZBrush. We will use Dynamesh to get the general form, and then from there we will work with the Trim selection, the Trim Dynamic brushes as well as the Trim Smooth edges brush. After this we will take a look at the noise maker option for adding general noise on your model and we will finish up the fist stage of the rock. So if this sounds interesting check out the first part of the video.

In the second video we will continue from the same place where we left off in the fist one, and the very first thing we will do is get out of Dynamesh and Remesh our rock. This is where the “Holy Trinity” rule of Duplicate/Divide/Project will come into play in order to help us get all the details from the Dynamesh model onto the new ZRemeshed model. After all this we will also see how we can use some custom brushes to add in some details on the rock and finish it up. Then in the end we will use UV Master plugin for a quick UV unwrap and we will use Substance Painter to do a quick bake of the maps. But enough with the explanation, go ahead and check out the video for yourself.

After watching those two videos you should have a better understanding of what it takes to create a Rock asset that you can use in your Visualization projects as well as use it as a game asset. To be perfectly honest i wanted to make this video first so i have a base on which i can reference for a future video that i want to make that will cover many of the things covered here but create something more “cool”. But for now this will be all, and like always if you enjoyed the videos and you learned something new then share the post around so it can reach more people.

Modeling Complex Carvings And Shapes on Uneven Surfaces in 3ds Max

In today’s post we will cover a bit of a complex topic and that is how to model complex shapes like carvings and such on uneven surfaces, or rounded ones. Generally from what i’ve seen many 3D artists do when they have to model some complex shape on an uneven surface, they go ahead and manually start building the model and move the vertecies one by one to get the carving to conform to the surface. Well that approach is not wrong, hell in some cases it’s the only option there is to take, BUT and this is a big but there is a way to work around issues like this and kinda cheat to save on time and nerves. This cheat that i am talking about is what this post is all about, but in order to be able to follow along you will need to download a script which you can get from the link below.

Download SlideKnit Script

OK so if you have already downloaded the script then you are all set. Now in case you don’t know how to install the script don’t worry as in the video below you will see me explain it step by step on how to install and how to make a custom menu inside 3ds Max and dock the plugin there. So after we go over how to install the script i’ll show you the model that i have in the scene that will help me showcase different types of scenarios for the SlideKnit script. You will see how you can wrap different types of geometry on different types of surfaces. Another important thing to note is that i will go and explain how you can unwrap rounded surfaces so they end up with planar UVW layout, which is actually quite important in our case. But enough with the intro, if what you saw here is something that might sound interesting to you go ahead and watch the video below.

So after watching the video i have to note one thing about myself personally, and that is that i was sick and coughing when i was making the video so if i didn’t edit out some place and maybe a cough slipped by i apologize. That aside i’m really hoping you guys had fun watching the video, and more importantly managed to learn something new. As you were able to see, SlideKnit is a small but yet very powerful script that can give you amazing results. Also i want to note it here one more time that I AM NOT THE MAKER of this script, so if you know who is leave a comment and i will leave a backlink to the creator as he really does deserve the kudos for making it.

And that would be it for this post, you know the drill by now, if you liked the video then like, comment and share it around so it can reach more people. So until next time …

Adding Dust and Aging Effect with V-Ray

Today we have a new post, and the videos that will be part of the post will be a part of a new “category” of posts that i want to do. Namely i want to have videos that will be a sort of a quick tip type posts. The idea behind these kinds of posts will be to take a certain theme, or a question that i’ve been asked and dive straight to it without any additional explanation. The idea for this came from a few readers that asked for more direct approach to the issue which would result with shorter videos and more directed videos. Now i am well aware that these types of videos can’t be made for all the topics that i choose to cover, but for certain things it might actually work quite well.

For the very first crack at the quick tip video i chose to make a video and answer a simple question, How to add aging or fading effect to your V-Ray materials? This is a very basic thing that you might want to know as it’s always a plus knowing how to add some variance to your model, and in the approach that i will show you in the video you will see how you can get that result by using a procedural mask and VrayDirt material. So if you want to see how you can do this type of thing procedural opposed to unwrapping it and manually making a distressed texture then check out the video below.

The second video covers a topic that’s a bit similar to the first video, but instead of adding procedural damage or fading we will see how we can add some dust to our model. After that we will see how we can setup a second texture ID channel and use it to help us with giving the dust a more natural “disturbed” look. So again if this is something that you would like to know and you aren’t really sure how to go about doing it, then check out the second video.

Ok so if you’ve watched the videos and are still reading this then i would like to ask you guys to leave your comments either here, or on YouTube and tell me if you liked these shorter quick tip type tutorials. And for now that would be it, like always if you did enjoy them like and share them around and keep coming back for more.

Creating Custom Floor Textures in 3ds Max and Photoshop

Today’s post comes as a direct result to a request i got about making a real world scale floor texture. It sounds pretty straight forward when you say it like that, i mean you get the project with the texture for the floor but then comes the realization that the image that the client sent you is something more in tune to a thumbnail, then an actual size for a high quality texture. On top of that he or she might want to have a different color in the pattern of the texture. This is where things can get a bit complicated as you are basically left with a task in which you need to deliver an end result but you don’t have the resources delivered to you, but rather you have to make them yourselves. Once you get to this point in the project, you might start thinking that you are in trouble if you don’t know how to make those high quality textures. Well this is where today’s post comes into play and will explain exactly how to go about dealing with this issue, and hopefully resolve it. Now when i had the initial idea about this video in my head it was a fast 20 min video, but as soon i started recording i actually came to a bit of a revelation as the theme was a tad bit bigger then i initially thought, so in the end i decided to split this into three logical parts opposed to having one huge hour and a half video. Since we do have a bit to cover lets get started with it.

In the first part of the video we will setup the image that we will create (you can choose any design that you might need for this part) and then we will start with the outlining process of the whole thing. After that we will see how we can get the outlined object scaled so we have a realistic scale model, and in the end we will render out a template which we will be able to use in the process. So this is where you would be advised to go and see the video for yourself.

In the second part ( and i do know this is a bit of a longer video ) we take the template that we made in 3ds Max and we bring it into Photoshop. Now i did my best to keep the video as newbie friendly (n00b fR13ndly) so that everyone can follow along even if you are not too proficient with Photoshop. We will cover a bit of layering management, some masking as well as some hand on paining and effects adding. All in all this ended up being a long but in depth video which will leave us with a fully customizable template that we can later use for any type of floor. Also you will hear me mention a few times that you can use this exact process to get Marble and stone floors which is totally true and applicable. But enough with the explanation, go ahead and check out the video.

In the last video we take what we made in Photoshop and we dive back into 3ds Max and see how we can use all those textures. Now the emphasis in the third video is put on using Real World Scale and to explain to you how you can get your textures to use real world scale referencing rather then the default tiling option. So go ahead and check out the video for yourself.

And with this we are coming to an end of our post for today. We covered quite a bit of different things and even though i didn’t expect the videos to be that long in the end i kinda enjoyed making them and i really hope you guys will enjoy watching them and even learn a few new things from them.

So like always subscribe, like and share and i’ll see you all in the next post.

Creating Simple Rugs in 3ds Max

So as much as i want to try and tackle on some gaming posts here, or at least try and set up a base for some gaming posts in the future i keep reverting back to architecture related themes.

Today we are going to tackle on one of the more commonly seen elements in scenes, and that is the rugs element. Rugs tend to find their way into many different scenes ranging from kitchens, bathrooms, bedrooms, living rooms and pretty much any other room that you might have, so knowing how to make them is a big plus. In this post we will see how we can create two different kinds of rugs that are totally different from each other and we will see how to obtain those two distinct looks.

In the first video you will learn how to create a soft looking fuzzy rug. To get this look i will go over the V-ray displacement modifier and explain how you can control the parameters of the said modifier so you end up with a realistic looking rug, and in the end we will even cover how to get that extra bit of fuzzyness (if that is a word) to show up in our rug render. So if this is something that might interest you, then check out this video.

For the second type of a rug we are going to try and make a longer, hair like strands rug. In this case we will see that we can’t use the same displacement type as we saw in the first video, so we will use the Max native Hair And Fur modifier. We will cover the properties that this modifier has, as well as how to tweak and control all the aspects of it so we can end up with a result that will make our rug look exactly the way we want it to look. So if this is something that might interest you then check out this second video.

Ok so that should cover the basics of creating a simple rug in 3ds Max. Now this is usually where i ask you to like and share the post, but i have the feeling like it’s seen as a formality by most and i don’t blame you if you don’t do it but for these two videos i want to ask everyone that actually watched and liked the videos to hit that LIKE button on YouTube. I’m simply curious as how the likes work as some of the videos got 6000 views and less then 100 likes which in YouTube’s book means they aren’t that good. So let’s see if we can drive those likes up a bit.

So if you are still reading this, and maybe even watched the videos and liked them then i salute you and leave you with this here link to download rug textures.

Modeling a Gabion Wall in 3ds Max

Just like you will be able to see in the video once you start watching it, i got the idea about making this video from a tutorial request from the Evermotion Forums. Namely one of the guys there was curious as to how you would go around and model a gabion wall (basically a bunch of rocks inside a wire mesh) without using maps. The reason why i liked the idea of making this video about this theme in particular is the fact that it can be a good example that can help me showcase the use of the Bloob compound object, as well as some modeling techniques that can help you get a generic rock without having to go outside of 3ds Max. And to top that we even get to see some use of the MassFX tools that come prepacked with 3ds Max.

So in the start of the video you will see how to start from a few primitives, and from there extrapolate a starting mesh for our rocks. Now opposed to what i would do for a project like this and take it to Zbrush for sculpting, here we will see how we can get some interesting looking results by sticking with 3ds Max only. After that we will also see how we can use MassFX to simulate the rocks and help them form the shape of our wall. In any case that was the short explanation, but if you are curious as to how you would model something like that then go ahead and watch the video for yourself.

If you watched the video and for some reason you weren’t able to find the texture that i used for the rocks, but you want to follow along feel free and pick it up here. Note though i did NOT make this texture and all the rights to it belong to whoever made it, i simply got it from Google and i am sharing it here with you guys. (Don’t want to get sued for something)

Seamless_Rock

So i hope you liked this video and you managed to learn something new, and like always if you liked what you saw you can help spread the word by liking on YouTube and Facebook, share and comment so it could reach more people and hopefully help someone else the same way it helped you out.

Starting with V-Ray Part-3, Understanding Antialiasing

So in the third part for this series we go over the Image Sampler or AA (Antialiasing). Anti aliasing is one of the main things that you need to understand how to tweak inside V-Ray in order to get a faster render, while maintaining the quality of the render.

In the video below you will be able to see what are the differences between using the Fixed and Adaptive DMC image samplers, as well as learn how does the AA work and what it’s used for. But i don’t want to make this post any longer than it should be so i’ll let you go and check out the video below.

I really hope that you enjoyed this video as well and if you have any questions feel free to leave them as a comment either here or on the YouTube channel. Also if you enjoyed this post then subscribe to the YouTube channel, share it around or like it and help spread the word around.

That’s all for now and remember, stay hungry for more knowledge as that is how you get to improve.

Hello World … Sorta

And here we go, the very first official post on the site, the origin, the start, the beginning. As this is the very first post on the site i would like to make it an introduction post in which i will give a brief explanation as to what this site is supposed to feature on it, and what you can expect to find on it. But before i get deeper into that i would like to drop a few quick lines about who i am and what i have been doing.

My name is Denis Keman (That’s the DK in the CGI .. i know pure genious) and i am an Autodesk certified Professional for 3DS max, and a inhouse and online training instructor. I have been doing that job for the better part of the last year and a half ( at the moment that i am writing this article ). Before i started teaching 3DS Max and VRay i did a lot of freelancing, which in all honesty i still do as i find that freelancing can be quite a fun thing to do, and if you are good at it you can make some decent cash too. Anyways back to the point of the site. I can’t say that i have great experience with site managing, or blogging though i did lead a blog about World of Warcraft back in the days when i used to play the game, but what i do have experience with is working with 3DS max and VRay and this site would be the media outlet where i would like to share the tips and tricks i have learned through my own experience of working with 3DS Max.

Start 

So in short, on this site you should expect to see posts detailing how to do certain tasks in 3DS Max, tutorials on building certain models, videos about various settings for V-Ray as well as  3DS Max, Marvelous Designer, 3D Coat, ZBrush and a bunch of other programs and plugins. So in any case i don’t want to make this post any longer so i’ll cut it here and i’ll leave you  with an image for the end that is ironically a START image.

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